What You Need to Know About Galley Hand Jobs

chef stirring food on the pan

Working in the shipping and oil rig industries requires extensive training as well as attending a technical school and apprenticeship. Some can come on board as an offshore rig worker. On the other hand, some may prefer working as a land-based rig worker. There are a lot of galley hand offshore jobs in Louisiana if you want to work in the oil rig or shipping industry.

Work as a galley hand

For starters, working as a galley hand requires multiple skills and training. Basically, they are trained to work in ships and oil rigs. Usually, a galley hand is responsible for assisting in meal preparation, service, and cleanup.

A galley hand also ensures that food is stored properly, coffee is promptly served, and the galley area is well-cleaned and maintained. He or she takes on the job of laundry and cleaning the sleeping quarters and latrines. Galley’s hands are often needed to complete a 12-hour work shift, including holidays.

Aside from cleaning and serving meals, a galley hand is also expected to do some, if not all, of the following tasks in an oil rig or ship.

  • Loading and unloading cargo and supplies from various vessels (e.g., choppers, boats, etc.)
  • Be familiar with the crew’s special nutrition or dietary restrictions
  • He or she should carry special certifications (e.g., Water Survival Certification)
  • Ensuring that food inventory is done and avoid spoilage
  • Other housekeeping, customer service, and food service tasks

To be a galley hand, one must have attained at least an Elementary education. He or she should be willing to be trained, especially in housekeeping and proper food preparation and service. The applicant should also be physically fit, with good communication skills, and is able to follow instructions clearly. More importantly, he or she should be able to interact well with other people.

The job requires working in a type of marine vessel including ships and oil rigs, and would most likely not see land for the next couple of months. That is why the applicant should not be scared of heights, large bodies of water, or small spaces. He or she should also possess excellent mental alertness to ensure safety at work every time.

Other work opportunities for offshore hands

electrician working and repairing

Aside from housekeeping and food preparation, offshore hands can also work with other tasks. This includes working as an electrician, mechanic, or oil rigger. Like any other offshore jobs, the abovementioned jobs require extensive training and undergoing an apprenticeship.

As an oil rigger, you are responsible for attaching the drill to the crane or a drilling derrick. The oil rigger is also required to give further instructions to the crane operator or the driller through radio or hand signals.

An electrician, on the other hand, is responsible for ensuring that the rig and galley’s electrical system is working well. He or she should be able to have undergone training in fixing commercial and residential electrical systems.

Lastly, the rig mechanic ensures that the gasoline and diesel engines are well-maintained. He or she should have undergone training in maintaining industrial equipment.

Working offshore can be challenging because you are mostly away from the land where usual resources can be found. Training is important in this kind of job as well as physical and mental capabilities.

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